Feb 152018
 

The recently disclosed Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities are some of the most dramatic security issues in the recent computer history. Fortunately even six weeks after public disclosure sophisticated attacks exploiting these vulnerabilities are not yet common to observe. Fortunately, because the hard- and software vendors are still stuggling to provide appropriate fixes.

If you happen to run a Linux system, an excellent tool for tracking your vulnerability as well as the already active mitigation strategies is the spectre-meltdown-checker script originally written and maintained by Stéphane Lesimple.

Within the last month I set myself the target to bring this script to Fedora and EPEL so it can be easily consumed by the Fedora, CentOS and RHEL users. Today it finally happend that the spectre-meltdown-checker package was added to the EPEL repositories after it is already available in the Fedora stable repositories since one week.

On Fedora, all you need to do is:

dnf install spectre-meltdown-checker

After enabling the EPEL repository on CentOS this would be:

yum install spectre-meltdown-checker

The script, which should be run by the root user, will report:

    • If your processor is affected by the different variants of the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities.
    • If your processor microcode tries to mitigate the Spectre vulnerability or if you run a microcode which
      is known to cause stability issues.
    • If your kernel implements the currently known mitigation strategies and if it was compiled with a compiler which is hardening it even more.
    • And eventually if you’re (still) affected by some of the vulnerability variants.
  • On my laptop this currently looks like this (Note, that I’m not running the latest stable Fedora kernel yet):

    # spectre-meltdown-checker                                                                                                                                
    Spectre and Meltdown mitigation detection tool v0.33                                                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                                                              
    Checking for vulnerabilities on current system                                       
    Kernel is Linux 4.14.14-200.fc26.x86_64 #1 SMP Fri Jan 19 13:27:06 UTC 2018 x86_64   
    CPU is Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz                                      
                                                                                                                                                                              
    Hardware check                            
    * Hardware support (CPU microcode) for mitigation techniques                         
      * Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation (IBRS)                                    
        * SPEC_CTRL MSR is available:  YES    
        * CPU indicates IBRS capability:  YES  (SPEC_CTRL feature bit)                   
      * Indirect Branch Prediction Barrier (IBPB)                                        
        * PRED_CMD MSR is available:  YES     
        * CPU indicates IBPB capability:  YES  (SPEC_CTRL feature bit)                   
      * Single Thread Indirect Branch Predictors (STIBP)                                                                                                                      
        * SPEC_CTRL MSR is available:  YES    
        * CPU indicates STIBP capability:  YES                                           
      * Enhanced IBRS (IBRS_ALL)              
        * CPU indicates ARCH_CAPABILITIES MSR availability:  NO                          
        * ARCH_CAPABILITIES MSR advertises IBRS_ALL capability:  NO                                                                                                           
      * CPU explicitly indicates not being vulnerable to Meltdown (RDCL_NO):  UNKNOWN    
      * CPU microcode is known to cause stability problems:  YES  (Intel CPU Family 6 Model 61 Stepping 4 with microcode 0x28)                                                
                                              
    The microcode your CPU is running on is known to cause instability problems,         
    such as intempestive reboots or random crashes.                                      
    You are advised to either revert to a previous microcode version (that might not have
    the mitigations for Spectre), or upgrade to a newer one if available.                
    
    * CPU vulnerability to the three speculative execution attacks variants
      * Vulnerable to Variant 1:  YES 
      * Vulnerable to Variant 2:  YES 
      * Vulnerable to Variant 3:  YES 
    
    CVE-2017-5753 [bounds check bypass] aka 'Spectre Variant 1'
    * Mitigated according to the /sys interface:  NO  (kernel confirms your system is vulnerable)
    > STATUS:  VULNERABLE  (Vulnerable)
    
    CVE-2017-5715 [branch target injection] aka 'Spectre Variant 2'
    * Mitigated according to the /sys interface:  YES  (kernel confirms that the mitigation is active)
    * Mitigation 1
      * Kernel is compiled with IBRS/IBPB support:  NO 
      * Currently enabled features
        * IBRS enabled for Kernel space:  NO 
        * IBRS enabled for User space:  NO 
        * IBPB enabled:  NO 
    * Mitigation 2
      * Kernel compiled with retpoline option:  YES 
      * Kernel compiled with a retpoline-aware compiler:  YES  (kernel reports full retpoline compilation)
      * Retpoline enabled:  YES 
    > STATUS:  NOT VULNERABLE  (Mitigation: Full generic retpoline)
    
    CVE-2017-5754 [rogue data cache load] aka 'Meltdown' aka 'Variant 3'
    * Mitigated according to the /sys interface:  YES  (kernel confirms that the mitigation is active)
    * Kernel supports Page Table Isolation (PTI):  YES 
    * PTI enabled and active:  YES 
    * Running as a Xen PV DomU:  NO 
    > STATUS:  NOT VULNERABLE  (Mitigation: PTI)
    
    A false sense of security is worse than no security at all, see --disclaimer
    

    The script also supports a mode which outputs the result as JSON, so that it can easily be parsed by any compliance or monitoring tool:

    # spectre-meltdown-checker --batch json 2>/dev/null | jq
    [
      {
        "NAME": "SPECTRE VARIANT 1",
        "CVE": "CVE-2017-5753",
        "VULNERABLE": true,
        "INFOS": "Vulnerable"
      },
      {
        "NAME": "SPECTRE VARIANT 2",
        "CVE": "CVE-2017-5715",
        "VULNERABLE": false,
        "INFOS": "Mitigation: Full generic retpoline"
      },
      {
        "NAME": "MELTDOWN",
        "CVE": "CVE-2017-5754",
        "VULNERABLE": false,
        "INFOS": "Mitigation: PTI"
      }
    ]
    

    For those who are (still) using a Nagios-compatible monitoring system, spectre-meltdown-checker also supports to be run as NRPE check:

    # spectre-meltdown-checker --batch nrpe 2>/dev/null ; echo $?
    Vulnerable: CVE-2017-5753
    2
    

    I just mailed to Stéphane and he will soon release version 0.35 with many new features and fixes. As soon as it will be released I’ll submit a package update, so that you’re always up to date with the latest developments.

    Aug 282014
     

    Today I just found out, how super easy it is to setup a safe HTTP authentication via Kerberos with help of FreeIPA. Having the experience of managing a manually engineered MIT Kerberos/OpenLDAP/EasyRSA infrastructure, I’m once again blown away by the simplicity and usability of FreeIPA. I’ll describe with only a few commands which can be run within less than 10 minutes how it’s possible to setup a fully featured Kerberos-authenticated Web server configuration. Prerequisite is a FreeIPA server (a simple guide for installation can be found for example here) and a RedHat-based Web server host (RHEL, CentOS, Fedora).

    Required Packages:
    First we are going to install the required RPM packages:

    # yum install httpd mod_auth_kerb mod_ssl ipa-client

    Register the Web server host at FreeIPA:
    Make sure the Web server host is managed by FreeIPA:

    ipa-client-install --domain=example.com --server=ipaserver.example.com --realm=EXAMPLE.COM --mkhomedir --hostname=webserver.example.com --configure-ssh --configure-sshd

    Create a HTTP Kerberos Principal and install the Keytab:
    The Web server is identified in a Kerberos setup through a keytab, which has to be generated and installed on the Web server host. First make sure that you have a valid Kerberos ticket of a FreeIPA account with enough permissions (e.g. ‘admin’):

    # kinit admin
    # ipa-getkeytab -s ipaserver.example.com -p HTTP/webserver.example.com -k /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.keytab

    This will create a HTTP service principal in the KDC and install the corresponding keytab in the Apache httpd configuration directory. Just make sure that it can be read by the httpd server account:

    # chown apache /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.keytab

    Create a SSL certificate
    No need to fiddle around with OpenSSL. Requesting, signing and installing a SSL certificate with FreeIPA is one simple command:

    # ipa-getcert request -k /etc/pki/tls/private/webserver.key -f /etc/pki/tls/certs/webserver.crt -K HTTP/webserver.example.com -g 3072

    This will create a 3072 bit server key, generate a certificate request, send it to the FreeIPA Dogtag CA, sign it and install the resulting PEM certificate on the Web server host.

    Configure Apache HTTPS
    The httpd setup is the only and last configuration which needs to be done manually. For HTTPS set the certificate paths in /etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl.conf:

    [...]
    SSLCertificateFile /etc/pki/tls/certs/webserver.crt
    SSLCertificateKeyFile /etc/pki/tls/private/webserver.key
    SSLCertificateChainFile /etc/ipa/ca.crt
    

    Additionally do some SSL stack hardening (you may also want to read this):

    [...]
    SSLCompression off
    SSLProtocol all -SSLv2 -SSLv3 -TLSv1.0
    SSLHonorCipherOrder on
    SSLCipherSuite "EECDH+ECDSA+AESGCM EECDH+aRSA+AESGCM EECDH+ECDSA+SHA384 EECDH+ECDSA+SHA256 EECDH+aRSA+SHA384 EECDH+aRSA+SHA256 EECDH EDH+aRSA !aNULL !eNULL !LOW !3DES !MD5 !EXP !PSK !SRP !DSS !RC4"
    

    Kerberos HTTP Authentication:
    The final httpd authentication settings for ‘mod_auth_kerb‘ are done in /etc/httpd/conf.d/auth_kerb.conf or any vhost you want:

    <Location />
      SSLRequireSSL
      AuthType Kerberos
      AuthName "Kerberos Login"
      KrbMethodNegotiate On
      KrbMethodK5Passwd On
      KrbAuthRealms EXAMPLE.COM
      Krb5KeyTab /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.keytab
      require valid-user
    </Location>
    

    That’s it! After restarting the Web server you can login on https://webserver.example.com with your IPA accounts. If you don’t already have a valid Kerberos ticket in the Web client, KrbMethodNegotiate On enables interactive password authentication.

    Troubleshooting
    In case you get the following error message in the httpd error log, make sure the keytab exists and is readable by the httpd account (e.g. ‘apache’):

    [Wed Aug 27 07:23:04 2014] [debug] src/mod_auth_kerb.c(646): [client 192.168.122.1] Trying to verify authenticity of KDC using principal HTTP/webserver.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
    [Wed Aug 27 07:23:04 2014] [debug] src/mod_auth_kerb.c(689): [client 192.168.122.1] krb5_rd_req() failed when verifying KDC
    
    May 012013
     

    Since a while, I always wanted to dig into RPM packaging as it would be very useful in my daily work with several hundreds of Red Hat machines. But I didn’t find a challenging software to package since it’s hard to find popular tools not available as RPM or at least SRPM already. This lasted until recently when I had to update Oracle JRockit Java, an enterprise JDK used with the Oracle Weblogic server, on multiple dozens of machines. Accurately defined the default installation of the JDK consists of only one folder which could be tar’ed and copied over, but a real Linux admin knows, this is not the way to install software. After several days of try and error and researching JVM packaging, the result is now available on my GitHub profile.

    Download Spec File and Oracle JRockit Installer

    The easiest way to get the .spec file is to clone the oracle-jrockit-rpm repository:

    [user@host ~]$ git clone https://github.com/ganto/oracle-jrockit-rpm.git

    The following files from the repository are then required to build the RPM:

    oracle-jrockit-rpm/SOURCES/jrockit-silent.xml
    oracle-jrockit-rpm/SPECS/java-1.6.0-jrockit.spec

    Also download the Oracle JRockit installer, the x64 and ia32 version is supported by the spec file, and place it into the oracle-jrockit-rpm/SOURCES directory.

    Use mock to build the RPMs

    Mock is a useful tool to build RPMs for various target platforms. Even for the Gentoo friends it is available in the portage.

    In the first step a chroot environment for the target distribution has to be setup. Mock already comes with a fair number of different definition files for different distributions, which can be found in /etc/mock. They can be adapted according to different requirements, e.g. when a local mirror or a different base set of packages should be used. When building RPMs for RHEL/CentOS 6, I had to modify the epel-6-x86_64.cfg to use the following setup command:

    config_opts['chroot_setup_cmd'] = 'install bash bzip2 coreutils cpio diffutils findutils gawk gcc grep sed gcc-c++ gzip info patch redhat-rpm-config rpm-build shadow-utils tar unzip util-linux-ng which make'

    After adding the unprivileged build user to the ‘mock’ group, the chroot can be initialized with the following command. In this example I want to build the RPMs for the already mentioned RHEL/CentOS 6 distributions:

    [user@host ~]$ mock -r epel-6-x86_64 --init

    Next, the SRPM needs to be packaged:

    [user@host ~]$ mock -r epel-6-x86_64 --buildsrpm --spec oracle-jrockit-rpm/SPECS/java-1.6.0-jrockit.spec --sources oracle-jrockit-rpm/SOURCES

    Eventually, the final RPMs can be compiled:

    [user@host ~]$ mock -r epel-6-x86_64 --rebuild /var/lib/mock/epel-6-x86_64/root/builddir/build/SRPMS/java-1.6.0-jrockit-1.6.0.37_R28.2.5_4.1.0-1.el6.src.rpm

    If everything went well, the final RPMs can be found under /var/lib/mock/epel-6-x86_64/root/builddir/build/RPMS:

    [user@host ~]$ ls -1 /var/lib/mock/epel-6-x86_64/root/builddir/build/RPMS
    java-1.6.0-jrockit-1.6.0.37_R28.2.5_4.1.0-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
    java-1.6.0-jrockit-demo-1.6.0.37_R28.2.5_4.1.0-1.el6.noarch.rpm
    java-1.6.0-jrockit-devel-1.6.0.37_R28.2.5_4.1.0-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
    java-1.6.0-jrockit-jdbc-1.6.0.37_R28.2.5_4.1.0-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
    java-1.6.0-jrockit-missioncontrol-1.6.0.37_R28.2.5_4.1.0-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
    java-1.6.0-jrockit-src-1.6.0.37_R28.2.5_4.1.0-1.el6.x86_64.rpm

    Final Thoughts

    Of course this guide can be used to build any RPM also from other spec files and for other distributions. With these notes, I hope to be more productive when an RPM quickly has to be compiled in the future.

    If you find a bug in the spec file, feel free to open an issue on GitHub, so I can fix and learn from it. Otherwise just leave a comment below if you think this guide or the spec file was useful.